Small trailer and what to pull it with?

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Re: Small trailer and what to pull it with?

JasonWx
In reply to this post by Brownski
The darn thing is around 12k +
that's a lot of nights in a motel with running water and heat...

"Peace and Love"
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Re: Small trailer and what to pull it with?

campgottagopee
Just get this



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Re: Small trailer and what to pull it with?

MC2 5678F589
In reply to this post by JasonWx
JasonWx wrote
The darn thing is around 12k +
that's a lot of nights in a motel with running water and heat...
Yep.

When you sit down and do the math, a lot of the RV arguments start to dry up. People end up not using them nearly as much as they think they will and hotels (even at $100 a night) would have been the better option.

Exceptions:

• If you make it a lifestyle. You need to be able to either live in it for a couple of years, or take off 3 months a year, every year.
• You have a specific trip in mind, you buy a used RV at a great price at the beginning, you sell it for the about the same price when you're done with the trip. I might do this with an RV and a snowmobile in Alaska some future Spring.
• You are able to convert your normal, everyday vehicle into a camper-lite option. This is my preferred method. Tents are good enough for me (but others do the Adventure Van, rooftop tent, or Truck Bed Sleeping Platform options), I can carry water, cooking supplies, table, chairs, a good cooler, and bikes. Car camping is a lot cheaper than buying an RV and you're not losing a ton of functionality. Yeah, I guess maybe sometimes I'd like to stand up inside somewhere, or use my own shower, but you gotta go pretty expensive to get that kind of camp-life.

A skier van/RV also needs a lot of insulation and running water hacks that standard vans/RVs don't include. It's all been done, and it's all on the Internet. I'm hoping they make great strides in Solar Panels and Electric motors in the next few years, so that when I'm finally ready to buy such a rig, energy will be cheap and plentiful and heating/cooling/etc. will make its way to a new generation of tricked out, 4WD stealthy camper vans.

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Re: Small trailer and what to pull it with?

DomB
MC - admittedly I have done almost no research, but re your last paragraph just the heat loss issues are what I think would be the biggest issue on some kind of tiny home/van set up for skiing.  Really, the significant issue I see is if folks want running water or the ability to take a shower in their setup.  I guess I wouldn't care about the shower, but in my hypothetical world of ski van/tiny home dreaming, running water in the winter sounds nice.  Good to hear that it may be a possibility with the materials out there.

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Re: Small trailer and what to pull it with?

evantful
I don't think its the worst idea, even if you only used it 30 days a year. Given you said you will be retiring I dont think thats outside the realm of reason possibility.

Lets scrap winter usage. Lets just say an affordable camper trailer is just not going to be able to make winter stays comfortable.

Take a look at the Cricket trailer from TAXA. Its a great lightweight trailer, that could easily be towed by a Sienna.
https://taxaoutdoors.com

The Cricket model has been out for a number of years now and Im starting to see very lightly used ones pop up.

Some benefits of a small camper trailer:

1) Proximity, generally your going to be able to stay a lot closer, if not inside many of the national parks, forest preserves, etc where you will visiting
2) Being outdoors. There truly is a certain feeling of connection being almost completely outside 24/7. The sounds, the smell, sleeping with a cool chill, or on a warm night. Its like hitting a reset.
3) Cooking. You will have a much easier time cooking for yourself, which means you can eat healthier, and save a good deal of money than having to worry about eating out 3x times a day. It gives you that added flexibility.
4) Hard asset. Now Im not going to argue that purchasing a trailer is a sound investment. But if you use it 30 days a year for say 5 years, at the end of it your still going to have a hard asset that can be sold if you so choose. Certainly it will have lost some value, and their are other yearly costs, but a hotel room over the same period is investment that cannot recovered.

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Re: Small trailer and what to pull it with?

x10003q
In reply to this post by JasonWx
JasonWx wrote
The darn thing is around 12k +
that's a lot of nights in a motel with running water and heat...
In a money comparison, yes. But the object is to spend time in a beautiful natural setting, far away from the Holiday Inn Express off some random interstate exit next to the Comfort Inn, Super 8, and Best Western with a Bob Evans across the street.

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Re: Small trailer and what to pull it with?

x10003q
In reply to this post by campgottagopee
campgottagopee wrote
Just get this

Diesel Brothers special. If you listen carefully you can here the fuel tank draining as you drive.

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Re: Small trailer and what to pull it with?

JasonWx
In reply to this post by x10003q
x10003q wrote
JasonWx wrote
The darn thing is around 12k +
that's a lot of nights in a motel with running water and heat...
In a money comparison, yes. But the object is to spend time in a beautiful natural setting, far away from the Holiday Inn Express off some random interstate exit next to the Comfort Inn, Super 8, and Best Western with a Bob Evans across the street.
I agree but also disagree...
there is something to be said for pissing in a toilet at 2am..
I guess at 54 I have different needs..If I was in my 20's the trailer sounds like a hoot..

"Peace and Love"
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Re: Small trailer and what to pull it with?

MC2 5678F589
In reply to this post by evantful
evantful wrote
Lets scrap winter usage.
Well, if you're not going skiing with it, what's the point? Now you just want a more comfortable tent (something you can achieve with a nicer sleeping pad).

Some benefits of a small camper trailer:

1) Proximity, generally your going to be able to stay a lot closer, if not inside many of the national parks, forest preserves, etc where you will visiting
2) Being outdoors. There truly is a certain feeling of connection being almost completely outside 24/7. The sounds, the smell, sleeping with a cool chill, or on a warm night. Its like hitting a reset.
3) Cooking. You will have a much easier time cooking for yourself, which means you can eat healthier, and save a good deal of money than having to worry about eating out 3x times a day. It gives you that added flexibility.
These 3 can be obtained with a tent and some cheap cooking equipment. And the tent opens up backcountry camping, too, which is a big help in national parks out west where the Campgrounds are more expensive, but the "remote sites" (some that are less than a mile walk) are free.

4) Hard asset. Now Im not going to argue that purchasing a trailer is a sound investment. But if you use it 30 days a year for say 5 years, at the end of it your still going to have a hard asset that can be sold if you so choose. Certainly it will have lost some value, and their are other yearly costs, but a hotel room over the same period is investment that cannot recovered.
Not sure what the resale value of a 5-year old, 150-day used camper is. But it's probably a lot less than you paid for it, unless you bought it used.

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Re: Small trailer and what to pull it with?

Brownski
In reply to this post by JasonWx
JasonWx wrote
The darn thing is around 12k +
that's a lot of nights in a motel with running water and heat...
I agree the prices on modern teardrops are ridiculous, especially when compared to normal pop-ups or travel trailers. If I wanted a teardrop (which I don't since I have kids) I would buy a used ATV trailer and build it out myself. There are lots of DIY options for them

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