AWD vs. FWD w/ Snow Tires

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Benny Profane Benny Profane
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Re: AWD vs. FWD w/ Snow Tires

True. If there's one thing that snow tires enhance greatly in snowy weather, it's braking. I've learned how to deal with that by just being more careful with all weathers, but, I do fear everyone else driving around in massive SUVs that weigh four or five tons, distracted by screens. It's why the first storm of the year is usually a disaster around here. That's right fool, it's called physics. Your Expedition is going to take a long long time to stop, especially since you thought you could squeak by another winter with those old tires.
funny like a clown
PeeTex PeeTex
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Re: AWD vs. FWD w/ Snow Tires

In reply to this post by JasonWx
My last one was retired after 170k - no oil burning issues, I have two now, one has 90k - no oil burning issues.
Don't ski the trees, ski the spaces between the trees.
Brownski Brownski
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Re: AWD vs. FWD w/ Snow Tires

In reply to this post by Harvey
Harvey wrote
Brownski wrote
But always remember that a car behind you is less likely to cause you problems then one in front of you
I worry about the guy behind me too. If someone stops short or if there is danger in front, and I know someone is behind me, I try to use up as much space as I can to safely stop, giving the guy behind me the best chance of not running into me.

Not sure if that is correct, but it is what I do.
This is true. I guess if I was making a serious point, it’s that, all things being equal, I feel better with other drivers in the rear view then in front of my windshield. As in, driving slow isn’t the answer, especially if it puts you in a big gaggle of other slow vehicles. Pass them as soon as you can. Not quite “go fast take chances” but.... anyway,regarding The actual question about snows, AWD etc... it seemed pretty obvious that FWD is better in snow then RWD, AWD is better then that and selectable 4x4 is better then that. Snow tires will be better in snow. Everything else being equal, light vehicles are easier to stop (and push out of a ditch) then heavy vehicles. Also, not all AWDs are created equal. I spent a day working with a guy who used to be an Audi sales manager and before that had sold BMWs. According to him Subaru’s system is considered much better then the other cheap brands (he thought BMW had the best overall).

All that being said, if you know how to drive in snow, you can get around with crappy tires on a no-ABS RWD and if you don’t you can get yourself into trouble with great tires on a Subie. I’m currently very happy with my compact 4x4 pickup with all-seasons but if I was stuck with, say, a Kia Rio, I don’t think that would hold me back.
"You want your skis? Go get 'em!" -W. Miller
Harvey Harvey
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Re: AWD vs. FWD w/ Snow Tires

Brownski wrote
Pass them as soon as you can. Not quite “go fast take chances” but...
I tend to take this approach too, but maybe not for a good reason.

Usually if I am driving IN a storm, it's early morning before first chair.  I tend to push it.  Passed some salt trucks and my paint job shows it.
"You just need to go at that shit wide open, hang on, and own it." —Camp
campgottagopee campgottagopee
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Re: AWD vs. FWD w/ Snow Tires

Full-size V8 pickup, 4 studded snows, left lane, hammer down

Lead, follow, or get the hell out of my way
D.B. Cooper D.B. Cooper
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Re: AWD vs. FWD w/ Snow Tires

All seasons vs. snow.....all seasons may be better in ice as the traction doesn't matter in ice.  You want to have more surface area, which is what I think all seasons offer.
Sent from the driver's seat of my car while in motion.
Milo Maltbie Milo Maltbie
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Re: AWD vs. FWD w/ Snow Tires

D.B. Cooper wrote
All seasons vs. snow.....all seasons may be better in ice as the traction doesn't matter in ice.  You want to have more surface area, which is what I think all seasons offer.
Obviously, you've never used Blizzaks.

mm
"Everywhere I turn, here I am." Susan Tedeschi
Milo Maltbie Milo Maltbie
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Re: AWD vs. FWD w/ Snow Tires

In reply to this post by Harvey
Harvey wrote
We have a steep driveway in the mountains.
Harvey wrote
Milo Maltbie wrote
99% of the time all season tires are fine.
And for me I need snow tires about 5% of the time.  The vast majority of my driving is on dry interstates.
Harvey wrote
Brownski wrote
Pass them as soon as you can. Not quite “go fast take chances” but...
I tend to take this approach too, but maybe not for a good reason.

Usually if I am driving IN a storm, it's early morning before first chair.  I tend to push it.  Passed some salt trucks and my paint job shows it.
It seems you  need winter tires a lot more than me.

mm
"Everywhere I turn, here I am." Susan Tedeschi
Harvey Harvey
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Re: AWD vs. FWD w/ Snow Tires

I had them a few CRVs ago. Separate rims. It was a royal pain in the ass, and they didn't last very long.  I especially hated storing the rims and changing them or putting them in the car so someone else could do it.  Granted they were not blizzaks. How many miles do you get out of them?

Now I try to buy new all seasons right before the season starts and run them for 18 months or 30 depending on how they look at the beginning of the second winter.

Maybe I made the "wrong" decision, but to me it feels like a better compromise.
"You just need to go at that shit wide open, hang on, and own it." —Camp
TheGreatAbyss TheGreatAbyss
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Re: AWD vs. FWD w/ Snow Tires

I bought separate winter rims and tires and I can attest that it's a ROYAL PIA, especially living in an apartment in Brooklyn.  I just didn't trust the thin stock 18 inch all seasons the car came with.  

Which actually leads to another point.  Whether you are running all seasons or winter tires the wheel size and tire width matter a lot.  15 or 16 inch rims with 65 width will be a lot better then if you're running 18 - 19 inch rims which a lot of cars are coming with these days.  

Maybe you can trust winter tires on 18/19s, but I certainly wouldn't trust all seasons.
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