Time to transition to Teleskiing?

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marznc marznc
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Re: Time to transition to Teleskiing?

Cunningstunts wrote
Mar - how do you like the Tele?

Any plans to switch over, or just something to play with?
You asking me?  Not planning to switch.  Have worked too hard in the last decade to become a solid advanced alpine skier.  Not starting something new at age 62.  More interested is seeing how much better I can get on alpine in the next decade.  Definitely not interested in buying another set of gear.

I'm playing with tele partially so I can relate better to my daughter's interest.  She switched while in Lake Placid and I doubt she'll go back to alpine.  Her teacher at North Country School is an L3 instructor and talked her into giving tele a try.  (John Doan also taught music at NCS and was her advisor.  His wife taught at NCS too and skis tele too.)  She proceeded to talk a classmate who was also an advanced alpine skier into learning with her.  Since her boots fit me well enough, I could satisfy my curiosity.  Tried renting a couple times but the shops I checked with didn't have skis remotely short enough (5'0", 112 lbs).

When I saw how easily my daughter could make turns with her heels down, that made it much easier to decide to spend some time with her tele gear.  She can ski expert terrain at Alta with her tele gear when making no effort to make tele turns.  She's at most an intermediate with tele turns since she essentially only had two seasons doing tele at North Country School.  Her last year was a very warm winter and the school ski hill never opened.  Only got a 3-4 afternoons at Whiteface that season.

When I play with her skis at small hills like Wachusett, I spend a few runs trying tele turns on green trails.  Then can just relax making parallel turns on blues/blacks for the rest of the ski day.
Cunningstunts Cunningstunts
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Re: Time to transition to Teleskiing?

marznc wrote
When I play with her skis at small hills like Wachusett, I spend a few runs trying tele turns on green trails.  Then can just relax making parallel turns on blues/blacks for the rest of the ski day.
This is mostly what I do when I ski on hardpack.  Some day maybe I'll focus more on my Tele edging technique and push myself to actually Telemark on steeper terrain.  I like that I can ski either technique, and that's why I'd never switch back.  I can ski better on Alpine boots with fixed heels, but the lack of comfort in Alpine boots has kept me away.

When I ski BC/Nordic/whatever, I almost always do Tele turns.  They are much easier for me on snow where i have to worry less about edge control and more about my fore/aft balance.  Alpine turns can often end in faceplants with freeheels in deep snow.  I also found snowplows on my XC/D stuff don't work so well in deep snow - so that was my main focus for learning the Telemark.  If I ski on groomed XC trails I very rarely do Tele turns unless I'm just playing around.  If I need control of speed I'm much more comfortable with Alpine techniques.
Don't grow up, it's a trap.
marznc marznc
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Re: Time to transition to Teleskiing?

Cunningstunts wrote
marznc wrote
When I play with her skis at small hills like Wachusett, I spend a few runs trying tele turns on green trails.  Then can just relax making parallel turns on blues/blacks for the rest of the ski day.
This is mostly what I do when I ski on hardpack.  Some day maybe I'll focus more on my Tele edging technique and push myself to actually Telemark on steeper terrain.  I like that I can ski either technique, and that's why I'd never switch back.  I can ski better on Alpine boots with fixed heels, but the lack of comfort in Alpine boots has kept me away.

When I ski BC/Nordic/whatever, I almost always do Tele turns.  They are much easier for me on snow where i have to worry less about edge control and more about my fore/aft balance.  Alpine turns can often end in faceplants with freeheels in deep snow.  I also found snowplows on my XC/D stuff don't work so well in deep snow - so that was my main focus for learning the Telemark.  If I ski on groomed XC trails I very rarely do Tele turns unless I'm just playing around.  If I need control of speed I'm much more comfortable with Alpine techniques.
Big difference is that a) I can afford to get well-fitted alpine boots with custom molded footbeds and liners and b) not interested in BC or nordic.  Too much work.  My current alpine boots are quite comfortable.

Having improved my alpine skiing technique, I will do a 10-15 min hike in-bounds for powder turns at this point.  Even willing to hike for Catherine's at Alta twice in one day now that I'm in better shape.  Didn't start year round ski conditioning until knee rehab (not a skiing injury) after age 55.

My daughter definitely likes the free heel aspect of tele even though she's more of a resort skier.  We haven't sold her alpine boots yet, but there isn't a pair of skis in our house with bindings set to those boots.
Cunningstunts Cunningstunts
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I can (could) afford custom fitted boots too!  I've had Alpine boots that were fine, but the last pair cost me so much money and so much time and pain, I quit.  I could go throw on a rental pair that were a half size too large and take up the space with socks and have no pain, but ski like shit, so I decided it wasn't worth wasting my money.

Even plastic Tele boots hurt my feet, but much less.  Some people's feet change, and apparently mine did and they are a nightmare now.  This is why I favor skiing with leather boots, but unless you've actually tried skiing dh with leather boots, you have no idea!  You'd probably ski better with plastic boots that were two sizes too large.

Plus after I learned how to carve I figured there was nothing else to do but learn to ski faster and (eventually) get hurt.
Don't grow up, it's a trap.
marznc marznc
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Re: Time to transition to Teleskiing?

Cunningstunts wrote
. . .
Even plastic Tele boots hurt my feet, but much less.  Some people's feet change, and apparently mine did and they are a nightmare now.  This is why I favor skiing with leather boots, but unless you've actually tried skiing dh with leather boots, you have no idea!  You'd probably ski better with plastic boots that were two sizes too large.

Plus after I learned how to carve I figured there was nothing else to do but learn to ski faster and (eventually) get hurt.
Luckily, my feet are relatively easy to fit for ski boots.

Skied in leather lace-up boots on straight skis at NCS back in the late 1960s.  That's where I learned to ski.  While I really liked skiing, not sure I would've bothered to get back on the slopes on a regular basis without buckle boots and the invention of ski pants and jackets that are warm and relatively light and thin.  Plus I never learned to make parallel turns on straight skis.  A lot easier with the current design of alpine skis.
Cunningstunts Cunningstunts
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I grew up skiing straight skis - I liked them a lot.  I didn't like shaped skis when I first tried them.  Felt like I was locked down to the snow.  Then I decided I should go take lessons even though I had been skiing for quite some time.  I learned a lot.

I remember a couple years back I took my leather boots out for a few runs on a not-so-nice February day.  Runs were firm and icy.  I crashed bad a couple times on some ice in the shaded woods where it was real slick.  In the sun where the snow was a little easier to handle i could make it to the bottom but I was freakin' gassed.  Every turn, just to get the skis to grip, not carve, I had to exaggerate all my movements like I was trying to carve.  I've skied leathers a lot off-piste and sometimes it's rough, but never was like that.
Don't grow up, it's a trap.
marznc marznc
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Re: Time to transition to Teleskiing?

I gather the Fey brothers are a big reason that tele is growing in New England and elsewhere.  Their shops are near Crotched in NH and CT.  In addition to Crotched, they have helped to set up rental fleets at Camelback, PA, SLC (Miles Fey), and Portland, OR (Sam Fey).

http://www.telemarkdown.com/about/

We are Erik and Martin Fey…the Fey Brothers. We entered the telemark/alpine touring business as backcountry skiers who came up with a novel idea — the patented nordic skiboard, which was then marketed as the Teleboard.  When customers also started asking for tele boots and bindings, we added lines of skis and  founded telemarkdown.com in 1999. We now carry Atomic, Black Diamond, Crispi, Elan, G3, Hart Skis,Icelantic, Liberty Skis, Rossignol, Rottefella, 22 Designs, and other great brands. Our goal was to bring clearance and closeout gear to the Tele and AT skier at the best prices possible and we also carry all the current years gear too.

Our pledge to you: We will beat any authorized dealer’s price on any gear of same year, model, and size. WE WON’T BE BEAT! Just call any time from 9 am to 9 pm Eastern at 603-533-5589 or 603-533-0276. The shop number in Connecticut is 860-428-5979.

Our CT Shop is:
ASPINOCK WOODS -570 RIVER RD PUTNAM, CT 06260….and when we say woods… we mean, it’s in the woods

Our NH Shop is:
Fey’s 55 HOOPER HILL RD NEW BOSTON, NH 03070…Only 15 mins from Crotched Mountain, 25 from Pat’s Peak and 45 from Sunapee, so perfect if you want to demo a pair for the day.

Whether you call or come into the shop in CT or NH, you’ll talk to Martin or Erik every time. We pride ourselves on personal service, going the extra mile for our customers and doing our best to remember all of them. We will bend over backward to get your gear to you on time — and for less.

Thanks,

ERIK and MARTIN
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