Ski Towns and Suicide

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Harvey Harvey
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Ski Towns and Suicide

This isn't exactly recent, but I just came across it on TGR:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/adventure-blog/2016/05/16/why-are-ski-towns-suicides-happening-at-such-an-alarming-rate/

It probably 2000 words and obviously heavy. But I read it all and it got me thinking.

Be interested to know what you think.
"You just need to go at that shit wide open, hang on, and own it." —Camp
Brownski Brownski
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Re: Ski Towns and Suicide

To me this seems like the smoking gun...

“On top of that, due to the transient nature of these resort communities, their social makeup is often more tenuous. Residents lack intergenerational relationships and deep social attachments, which are protective against suicide. That means that, when faced with issues, people have less support. “They’ve moved away from their natural support systems, and they have to rebuild a support system,” says Michael H. Allen, M.D., professor of psychiatry at the University of Colorado Depression Center“

To a greater or lesser extant, when an individual moves to a ski town, he/she is choosing the lifestyle over thier families. I can’t claim to understand suicide in any way but I feel like disconnectedness from those around you, lack of a good family support system and loneliness in general must amplify whatever it is that drives people to it.
"You want your skis? Go get 'em!" -W. Miller
Benny Profane Benny Profane
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Tough stuff. The dark side of "living the dream". Not a good place when you've spent your life earning nothing, saving nothing, surrounded by a constantly rotating group of either people just like yourself, and your only bond is skiing and drugs and alcohol, or wealthy ner do wells who pull all of it off wearing the latest fashions and always buying new skis and stuff. Then, boom, you're 50ish, and get injured, probably losing your job in the process and no money or insurance to fix your body. Zero support system, parents probably dead by now back home, and highly doubtful there is a woman there for emotional help. Hell, chances for a romantic relationship at this point is out of the question, since you're now damaged goods to the minimal female population. Oh, and, yeah, the rent is two months overdue, and your car won't fix itself. Not a good place to be.
funny like a clown
MC2 5678F589 MC2 5678F589
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Re: Ski Towns and Suicide

In reply to this post by Brownski
Brownski wrote
To me this seems like the smoking gun...

“On top of that, due to the transient nature of these resort communities, their social makeup is often more tenuous. Residents lack intergenerational relationships and deep social attachments, which are protective against suicide. That means that, when faced with issues, people have less support. “They’ve moved away from their natural support systems, and they have to rebuild a support system,” says Michael H. Allen, M.D., professor of psychiatry at the University of Colorado Depression Center“

To a greater or lesser extant, when an individual moves to a ski town, he/she is choosing the lifestyle over thier families. I can’t claim to understand suicide in any way but I feel like disconnectedness from those around you, lack of a good family support system and loneliness in general must amplify whatever it is that drives people to it.
Why is this different than old people moving to Florida (or wherever) when they retire? Is it the age difference that makes it better for old people (they've already lived their lives, so they don't have the same conflict of expectation vs. reality)? Or is it the financial security (lower cost of living, lower housing prices, and even the old people who were shitty savers get Social Security and free doctors through Medicare)?

I'd be interested to know if the same problems are present in Canadian ski towns, or other countries with universal health care programs that include mental health services.
frank wright frank wright
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Re: Ski Towns and Suicide

In reply to this post by Benny Profane
A week or so ago a local mother died of cancer leaving behind three kids I think the oldest was around twelve.  Just the other day a friend was trying to put the pieces together of whose who and how they are connected. I have a difficult time keeping track of people and all the inbreeding that ski towns provide.  She kept saying his wife killed herself a year or two ago.  A couple hours later I put it all together.  Another friend's wife tried to kill herself about a dozen times over the course of a couple years.  He finally gave up trying to stop her and let her do it.  Another friend of mine had an employee disappear so he went to his house trying to check on him and found him in the closet.   I would never want to be my friend.  A girlfriend of mine went off the deep end for a week or two when a friend of her's used up all the coke sitting around the house, drank, popped a million pills, and stuck a hose from his tail pipe into the car.  Talk about going out with a bang.  The psychologist mentioned that the drugs and alcohol were the liquid courage to make it all happen.  Imagine that.  Something to chew on.  

I can go on and on.  Comes with the territory.  I don't think it's any different than living anywhere else.  Make what you want of it, sensationalize everything.  Create dumb theories  as to why it happens and all the triggers.  On the other hand I could care less.  It's kind of sad, but I am honestly having alot of trouble with cancer taking the life someone without cause or reason.
Benny Profane Benny Profane
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Re: Ski Towns and Suicide

In reply to this post by MC2 5678F589
MC2 5678F589 wrote
Brownski wrote
To me this seems like the smoking gun...

“On top of that, due to the transient nature of these resort communities, their social makeup is often more tenuous. Residents lack intergenerational relationships and deep social attachments, which are protective against suicide. That means that, when faced with issues, people have less support. “They’ve moved away from their natural support systems, and they have to rebuild a support system,” says Michael H. Allen, M.D., professor of psychiatry at the University of Colorado Depression Center“

To a greater or lesser extant, when an individual moves to a ski town, he/she is choosing the lifestyle over thier families. I can’t claim to understand suicide in any way but I feel like disconnectedness from those around you, lack of a good family support system and loneliness in general must amplify whatever it is that drives people to it.
Why is this different than old people moving to Florida (or wherever) when they retire? Is it the age difference that makes it better for old people (they've already lived their lives, so they don't have the same conflict of expectation vs. reality)? Or is it the financial security (lower cost of living, lower housing prices, and even the old people who were shitty savers get Social Security and free doctors through Medicare)?

I'd be interested to know if the same problems are present in Canadian ski towns, or other countries with universal health care programs that include mental health services.

Totally different. We're talking about active males that have hit the end of the line through no choice of their own. Old people who move to Florida usually do it with a spouse, savings built up from a lifetime of working real jobs, possibly a pension, and almost always fall into a vast support system of others just like them in ready built communities long established. And, yes, social security and Medicare help a lot to take the pressure off. This article talks about the 50ish people who have many years before they can think of using those programs, and, even then, SS ain't going to get you much in ski country.

I could easily live in Florida without financial worries (but I won't), but I wont live in a ski town out west because it is no place for an old person of middle class means. No woman, either. Florida ratio of women to men over 55 is pretty awesome.

Interesting point about Canada, though, although housing is still pretty expensive.
funny like a clown
MC2 5678F589 MC2 5678F589
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Re: Ski Towns and Suicide

Benny Profane wrote
, but I wont live in a ski town out west because it is no place for an old person of middle class means. No woman, either. Florida ratio of women to men over 55 is pretty awesome.
I thought you lived in western ski towns for a few months at a time in winter?
Z Z
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Re: Ski Towns and Suicide

In reply to this post by Benny Profane
Among this dark subject we have the thought of Benny cruising the grandmas for a date in Sunny FL
"It is better to go skiing and think of God, than go to church and think of sport."
Artic Explorer Fridtjof Nansen
Benny Profane Benny Profane
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Re: Ski Towns and Suicide

In reply to this post by MC2 5678F589
MC2 5678F589 wrote
Benny Profane wrote
, but I wont live in a ski town out west because it is no place for an old person of middle class means. No woman, either. Florida ratio of women to men over 55 is pretty awesome.
I thought you lived in western ski towns for a few months at a time in winter?

Sure, yeah, but I refuse to live there. Actually, I can't afford it. No place to be a renter at 70. Can't afford a half million for a crappy old condo.
funny like a clown
Benny Profane Benny Profane
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Re: Ski Towns and Suicide

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Z wrote
Among this dark subject we have the thought of Benny cruising the grandmas for a date in Sunny FL
Hey man, don't knock it. Ain't nothing in a ski town for an old guy unless you're rich. Hell, ain't much for a young guy.
funny like a clown
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