blizzak vs pirelli snow tires

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Z Z
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blizzak vs pirelli snow tires

Need to get some snows for my Subaru Outback
The tires that come on the car are awful in snow which seems odd for Subaru to have selected crappy snow performing tires.  I’ve slide out twice recently.

I’ve had Blizzaks in past and liked them.  I could get a screaming good deal on Pirelli ice zero FR

Anyone have any experience with Pirelli?

if You French Fry when you should Pizza you are going to have a bad time
Hoser Hoser
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Re: blizzak vs pirelli snow tires

No, but have Nokian Hakkapeliitta (Hakka's) studless snow tires on the Rav4, Highlander, and even a Corolla (now a CH-R).  Right dealer tires on new cars suck including SUVs. Ok so its from Toyota technically, not the dealer.

Although technically snows, I run the studless year round.  Never, ever had an issue chasing the race circuit though the dacks and into Vt and NH chasing college events.    

Get about 40k, stretch to 50k, so a couple years they need replacing but not worth the time nor cash to switch to summer tires.  Besides, they are great in the rain, summer storms, and mud dirt seasonal roads when hiking or exploring.
Cunningstunts Cunningstunts
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Re: blizzak vs pirelli snow tires

Just a thought Hoser, but Hakka's are super soft tires with a lot of rolling resistance.  Using them in warm months surely degrades their life quicker.  They'd probably last you 4-5 winters (I used to get 3 out of mine) and your summer tires would last the same, and you'd get better gas mileage.  All-in-all in would likely be cheaper as Nokians are really expensive and you could get some middle-of-the-road summer tires (all seasons, whatever) that would be less costly than the two or three sets of Nokians you are using in the same mileage.

Don't grow up, it's a trap.
Cunningstunts Cunningstunts
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Re: blizzak vs pirelli snow tires

In reply to this post by Z
To address the original question.  The tires your Subaru came with are all season tires.  To compare their performance to a dedicated snow tire is not a fair assessment.

Blizzaks are not very great snow tires last time I owned a pair, but to be fair, that was a long time ago and they do have different sub-models.

I've never been a fan of Pirelli tires, but they'll likely be better than what you have.

Best option is to look at what you are interested in on a Tire Rack review.  They often have side-by-side, real world comparisons.  I've found them pretty useful.

The best snow tires I ever used were Nokian Hakkapeliitta 2's.  They are so good we used to use them for winter rally racing.  You can't get those anymore.  It looks like the closest thing is the 8 or 9.
Don't grow up, it's a trap.
Z Z
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Re: blizzak vs pirelli snow tires

In reply to this post by Cunningstunts
I agree running snows year round will wear them really fast as the rubber is softer

The Blizzaks are a bit softer than some of the others on the outer rubber then after wear it gets to a firmer more all season rubber

The Perilli give up some ice performance but will last a bit longer.  Should be a significant upgrade over the crappy tires my car comes with.  My think8ng is get snows and get 6 years from the two pairs compared to 3 years from a single set.  I drive about 20 k a yr.
if You French Fry when you should Pizza you are going to have a bad time
Hoser Hoser
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Re: blizzak vs pirelli snow tires

Doing the math it’s a wash of buying snows every two years full time or every four years as using summer tires each six months.    At $15 per tire to switch that’s $120 a year or $480 over the four year period.    Plus summer tires assume $75 each or $300.  

So additional $780 every for years.   If I can get four snows for $200 it’s a wash plus avoid 8 trips to tire dealer.   Although I am there anyway for rotations.    

To make it work would need another set of rims then do the switch each six months myself.  No idea how much rims run.  Would have to be less than the $120 switch fee per year times life of vehicle.   I need an excel sheet I think.  
Cunningstunts Cunningstunts
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Re: blizzak vs pirelli snow tires

If you buy a package from a place like Tire Rack you can usually get steel rims pretty cheap.

I never pull tires on and off that much, it's not really great for the bead.
Don't grow up, it's a trap.
Z Z
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Re: blizzak vs pirelli snow tires

Rims run 90 bucks for ugly black steel ones or 120 for better ones

The proble is my car has the integrated pressure sensor which adds cost

I was looking at some stuff on the internet about going to a smaller snowtire and rim as it provides better traction and is lower cost.  Not sure what that does to your speedometer and mileage then - I think it messes with that.
if You French Fry when you should Pizza you are going to have a bad time
Cunningstunts Cunningstunts
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Re: blizzak vs pirelli snow tires

Z wrote
Rims run 90 bucks for ugly black steel ones or 120 for better ones

The proble is my car has the integrated pressure sensor which adds cost

I was looking at some stuff on the internet about going to a smaller snowtire and rim as it provides better traction and is lower cost.  Not sure what that does to your speedometer and mileage then - I think it messes with that.
You don't need to run the TPS.  I never did on my winter tires.  You just need to actually periodically check your tire pressure.

If you go to a smaller rim, first verify that it will actually clear your brake caliper.  You should be able to get that info from a dealer or on a tire dealer site like TR.  

Then if you go to a smaller rim, you use a larger sidewall.  It won't be exactly the same in terms of rolling diameter but close enough.  Some cars even have a cal in the computers so you can compensate for winter tires.

And generally, yes, it is better to go with a narrower, higher profile sidewall for winter tires if you want the best deep snow and ice performance.  This gives the tire more "give" when cornering to let the tread actually grip and not break away into a snappy slide.  Narrower tires put more psi on the road and help deform those little sipes in the tire around anything they can find traction on.

If you look at winter racing, you'll notice they run tires that look like bike tires.
Don't grow up, it's a trap.
Harvey Harvey
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Re: blizzak vs pirelli snow tires

In reply to this post by Z
Z wrote
The proble is my car has the integrated pressure sensor which adds cost
I did all the math discussed by Hoser and was on the fence (and I have a mechanic across the street who can swap my rims cheap.  Ultimately it was the fact that if I didn't want the low pressure light on all the time I needed expensive rims.

Now I just run the crappy all seasons.  My situation is different from Z's as maybe 80% of my winter mileage is interstate.

The real problem with all seasons is that when they are half used up.  They are OK in the snow when new, when worn down not so much.

For me the issues is really just getting up our driveway. Now that I ski alone mostly (without family), when my tires are worn, like they are now, if I can't get up the driveway I park at the bottom and walk up.  When I am solo that is one or two trips. With the family it is much more.
"You just need to go at that shit wide open, hang on, and own it." —Camp
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