Market Philosophy: What You Got?

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Harvey Harvey
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Market Philosophy: What You Got?

I've alway been interested in the stock market.  Not interested enough to do anything too stoopid, but interested. Tons of opinions out there, I want to hear yours.

Sorry for all choices below, but I tried to think of all the possibilities for answers. Seems like after you post a poll there is always an option you forgot. I added the venerable "other" if you can't find a choices that suits you.
So,the Market took a bit of a digger. My take:
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"If it's my mountain, I'm installing a fixed grip and telling the lifties to stuff the beginners into chairs as aggressively as they have to, to keep it going full speed." —Brownski
Darkside Shaman Darkside Shaman
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Re: Market Philosophy: What You Got?

Invest in Real Estate in the Gore Mt area!!!
Ski More at Old Gore!  
nepa nepa
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Re: Market Philosophy: What You Got?

Other: Symtom of a larger problem... I'm thinking there will be a fairly quick rebound from this crash... but there are larger problems on the horizon.

I'm putting my money in R&D for creating snow that never melts.
Z Z
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Re: Market Philosophy: What You Got?

In reply to this post by Harvey
I've been pairing out big winners with Euro or Asian exposure and clunkers from my portfolio over the past month or so expecting this.  I did increase my bond exposure as well.

August sucks too many pros are on vacation so the computer trades are dominating.  Waiting for a clear up sign in the fall to get back in.

The key is with the current domestic and international combo the fed cant raise rates.  If they did it's time to go to cash.

Safest stocks are health care right now.
"It is better to go skiing and think of God, than go to church and think of sport."
Artic Explorer Fridtjof Nansen
riverc0il riverc0il
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Re: Market Philosophy: What You Got?

In reply to this post by Harvey
The nice thing about about investing long term in a 401k is never caring one bit about markets being up OR down. I used to play around with allocations when I first started investing but now I just allow the financial institution to auto adjust me in age based portfolios. Being in my 30s, it is almost stocks still and I could care less. My rate of return is a reasonable 7% over the long haul plus employer match. Hey, whatever happens, I'll have way more money than I'll need when I pull it out in 30 years. Assuming something catastrophic doesn't happen first.

The computers managing this type of stuff scare me a bit. But the good news is that over adjustments one way catch up pretty quickly. Corrections are just that and they balance out in the long term with positive growth.

You want to talk about getting sucker punched by a market? We bought our house in 2007 one month before the housing market went bust. Eight years later and we're still underwater by $20k, couldn't move if I wanted to. Glad I like it here but I don't like being forced without options. At least with stocks and retirement funds, if you take a small hit... it almost is never a major blow unless you were an idiot and didn't allocate correctly when you are nearing retirement age.
Harvey Harvey
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Re: Market Philosophy: What You Got?

If you are 30, this is undoubtedly a good thing.

I'm kind of pushing allocations at 56. Having enough to retire seems like such a long shot that some risk seems mandatory.
"If it's my mountain, I'm installing a fixed grip and telling the lifties to stuff the beginners into chairs as aggressively as they have to, to keep it going full speed." —Brownski
Z Z
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Re: Market Philosophy: What You Got?

Best advice to the younger crowd is to no matter what put at least 10% of your earnings into your company 401k.

I also shun all index funds.  They have become so big and with computerized trading part of the problem.  They aren't trading on fundamentals on the underlining stocks.  They just move with the "sea level" of the market as a whole.  Look for stocks beating the index with superior long term earnings or non index funds with Morningstar ratings 4+ stars.

I use Blue Chip Growth newsletter.  It's 99 bucks a year and has provided  many of years consistent conservative  market beating portfolio growth.  They also have a free portfolio grader service which is how I got started with them.

http://navelliergrowth.investorplace.com/track-record.html#.Vd2ypUr3arU

"It is better to go skiing and think of God, than go to church and think of sport."
Artic Explorer Fridtjof Nansen
nepa nepa
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Re: Market Philosophy: What You Got?

In reply to this post by riverc0il
riverc0il wrote
I used to play around with allocations when I first started investing but now I just allow the financial institution to auto adjust me in age based portfolios.
Be careful with your provider's rebalancing and portfolio modeling tools.  I work in I.T. domain of the Retirement Services industry.  Especially during volatile market conditions, we have seen some unintended side effects caused by the auto-rebalance feature found in many of the defined contribution retirement plans that we administer.  Also, most portfolio models have some flawed assumptions built into them.  Over the past ten to 15 years, strategies have changed significantly, but most models have remained the same.
riverc0il riverc0il
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Re: Market Philosophy: What You Got?

nepa wrote
Be careful with your provider's rebalancing and portfolio modeling tools.  I work in I.T. domain of the Retirement Services industry.  Especially during volatile market conditions, we have seen some unintended side effects caused by the auto-rebalance feature found in many of the defined contribution retirement plans that we administer.  Also, most portfolio models have some flawed assumptions built into them.  Over the past ten to 15 years, strategies have changed significantly, but most models have remained the same.
No doubt. The problem is that lay people and amateurs can probably get into trouble trying to make those adjustments. I'm a strong believer that I'd rather not maximize my return and leave some potential on the table rather than trying to play pro investor and make a bad decision and cost me way more money than I might have saved. I'll probably pay a lot more close attention in my 50s but at this time, I can't imagine rebalancing is going to make many changes except slightly less stock when I get out of my 30s.
Z Z
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Re: Market Philosophy: What You Got?

In my 30s I was 100% stocks.  I do both mutual finds and a portfolio of 10-15 stocks that I manage myself which I have done well with mostly with the help of a few different paid investment newsletters the one I use now I really have done well with.  I also have an MBA.

Now in my later 40's about 80/20.  Will gradually move towards safety as my horizon changes.  
"It is better to go skiing and think of God, than go to church and think of sport."
Artic Explorer Fridtjof Nansen
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