Fat Skis in Non-Powder Conditions

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bumps bumps
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Fat Skis in Non-Powder Conditions

Can't remember if anyone posted about this study, which claims that using fat skis (not defined in the article, but it sounds like they're referring to anything with a waist above the mid-90s?) in hard conditions isn't good for your knees. Makes sense, but what do I know?

skimore skimore
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Re: Fat Skis in Non-Powder Conditions

Just don't ski on hard snow. It sucks anyway
Spongeworthy Spongeworthy
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Re: Fat Skis in Non-Powder Conditions

In reply to this post by bumps
I wouldn't call it much of a study. He took a few measurements, and didn't exclude any other causes for the supposed sore knees and ankles. He even concedes a lack of data regarding injuries. He'd probably give a D to any student who handed in such a poorly supported "study."

There might be more to it, but the article is poorly written (e.g., "undo" instead of "undue" or "there is no data").
"They don't think it be like it is, but it do." Oscar Gamble
snoloco snoloco
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Re: Fat Skis in Non-Powder Conditions

In reply to this post by skimore
skimore wrote
Just don't ski on hard snow. It sucks anyway
On the ec, "hard snow" is all you get much of the time.  Unless you want to hike for miles and miles and miles every run.  I only ski lift served, so I am on "hard snow" 90% of the time.  However, I did get 3 powder days this year.
I've lived in New York my entire life.
Glade Runner Glade Runner
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Re: Fat Skis in Non-Powder Conditions

Just ski off trail there's powder everywhere.
nepa nepa
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Re: Fat Skis in Non-Powder Conditions

In reply to this post by Spongeworthy
Spongeworthy wrote
I wouldn't call it much of a study. He took a few measurements, and didn't exclude any other causes for the supposed sore knees and ankles. He even concedes a lack of data regarding injuries. He'd probably give a D to any student who handed in such a poorly supported "study."

There might be more to it, but the article is poorly written (e.g., "undo" instead of "undue" or "there is no data").
“Right now we have data in the theoretical sense,” he said.

In other words, we have a small group of people who share the same opinion... now let's waste some money and try to prove ourselves right.
Benny Profane Benny Profane
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Re: Fat Skis in Non-Powder Conditions

Has my interest because I spent a day at Killington last year on my fat skis (don't ask) mostly on groomers and my knee came out the other side real sore. Very sore. For like two months. Pre existing condition, but, still.......
funny like a clown
telerider telerider
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Re: Fat Skis in Non-Powder Conditions

I've skied "fat skis" for years in firm conditions, as has my wife.  Not as quick edge to edge, but when you tele I don't think it matters as much.  I hurt my knee last year doing a flat spin messing around on a Tannery, but that wasn't due to the ski, just me being bored on a (generally) boring run.
snoloco snoloco
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Re: Fat Skis in Non-Powder Conditions

In reply to this post by Glade Runner
Glade Runner wrote
Just ski off trail there's powder everywhere.
And get my pass pulled for going out of bounds.
I've lived in New York my entire life.
riverc0il riverc0il
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Re: Fat Skis in Non-Powder Conditions

In reply to this post by skimore
skimore wrote
Just don't ski on hard snow. It sucks anyway
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